Create Jobs for USA

  • Learn about how Starbucks and OFN partnered to

  • address the American jobs crisis

 

Overview

In November 2011, OFN partnered with Starbucks to launch Create Jobs for USA, a unique initiative that leveraged the power of CDFIs to address the U.S. jobs crisis and help put people back to work. The initiative combined corporate donations and crowdfunding from individuals and small businesses to create and retain jobs. Banana Republic, Google Offers, Citi, MasterCard, and other companies also joined the effort.

Create Jobs for USA ran through December 2014. In three years, it raised more than $15.2 million in donations, which participating CDFIs turned into $105 million in financing for businesses to create or retain more than 5,000 jobs.

OFN has gathered lessons learned from the initiative to share in a three-part series of reports that reflects on Create Jobs for USA and offers insights that CDFIs can use in their own job reporting efforts. Read the first two reports now.

How it Started

In 2011, Howard Schultz, chief executive officer of Starbucks Coffee Company, was eager to find a creative, inclusive, and swift way to address the country’s unemployment crisis. But he needed a partner with a proven reputation for excellence and a history of creating jobs to join in the effort.

Starbucks teamed up with OFN, the leading network of CDFIs, community development financial institutions that lend and invest in economically distressed places in the U.S.

In November 2011 Starbucks and OFN formed a partnership to launch Create Jobs for USA, a philanthropic initiative to mobilize individuals, CDFIs, and corporations to address the troubling rise in unemployment that followed the Great Recession.

How it Worked

Create Jobs for USA combined corporate donations and crowdfunding to establish the Create Jobs for USA Fund. OFN managed the Fund and used the donations to award capital grants to 120 high-performing CDFIs across the country.

These CDFIs leveraged their Create Jobs for USA awards with additional loans from traditional banks, foundations, and other investors to make loans to community businesses. All of the donations went directly to loans for community businesses, and none were used for operating expenses.

In three years, Create Jobs for USA raised more than $15.2 million in donations.

Every $1 raised through the Create Jobs for USA Fund supported $7 in loans to small businesses, microenterprises, nonprofit organizations, commercial real estate developers, and housing developers.

The Impact it Had

CDFIs leveraged $15.2 million in donations into $105 million in lending to community businesses, which created or retained more than 5,000 jobs.

Where Donations Originated

Create Jobs for USA raised a total of $15.2 million from a diverse range of donors, including corporations, foundations, small businesses, nonprofits, and individuals.

The Starbucks Foundation seeded the Create Jobs for USA Fund with a $5 million donation. Major corporate supporters also included Google Offers, Banana Republic, and Citi, who each raised $1 million or more for the Fund. In addition, the Schultz Family Foundation donated $1 million on the first anniversary of the Create Jobs for USA initiative. Other corporations, small business, and nonprofits raised more than $600,000 for the Fund.

Indivisible Bracelet, Coffee, Mug and Tumbler

Individual donations totaled $3.5 million, the large majority of which was raised through the "Indivisible" wristbands program. Anyone who donated $5 online or at one of Starbucks' 7,000 retail locations received an all American made "Indivisible" wristband, of which 100% of the donation went to Create Jobs for USA. The program offered individuals and corporations a way of showing their support, with more than 800,000 people receiving wristbands through individual and corporate contributions.

Starbucks also generated an additional $1 million for the Create Jobs for USA Fund by launching an "Indivisible" line of products—coffee, mugs, tumblers—sold in their retail locations through early 2013. For every purchase of an "Indivisible" product, Starbucks made a donation to the Fund.

Types of Businesses Supported

Create Jobs for USA funds supported community businesses, which create and retain jobs in low-income, low-wealth, and other disadvantaged communities. These include small businesses, microenterprises, nonprofit organizations (such as charter schools, day care, and senior centers), commercial real estate, and affordable housing.

Take a look at some of the Create Jobs for USA videos and success stories to read about the different businesses the initiative has supported in urban, rural, and native communities across the U.S.

Lessons Learned

OFN is publishing a series of three publications to report on the results and lessons learned from the initiative. The reports focus on the overall lessons learned about Create Jobs for USA, as well as specific lessons learned and best practices related to collecting, tracking, and analyzing data on job creation and retention.

Find a Loan

Community businesses seeking a loan can refer to the list of Awardees and OFN's CDFI Locator to identify a local CDFI that may be able help.

These supporters have stood up and said they believe in Americans and want to help them get back to work. Read about their commitments to the program below.

Founding Members

Starbucks Logo Starbucks: Starbucks and the Opportunity Finance Network (OFN) teamed up to launch the Create Jobs for USA Fund on Nov. 1, 2011. The Starbucks Foundation seeded the Fund with a $5 million donation and helped distribute red, white, and blue Indivisible wristbands to donors who contributed $5 or more.
 
OFN Logo Opportunity Finance Network: Opportunity Finance Network is a national network of community development financial institutions (CDFIs) investing in opportunities that benefit low-income, low-wealth, and other disadvantaged communities across America.

Headline Supporters ($1MM+ Donations)

Banana Republic Logo Banana Republic: Banana Republic was one of the first partners to join OFN and Starbucks to support the Create Jobs for USA Fund. Special shopping events raised $1 million in 2012.
 
Citi Logo Citi: Citi Community Development and the Citi Foundation reinforced their support for community businesses by making a $1 million contribution to Create Jobs for USA Fund, and by empowering Citi ThankYou® Members to redeem their rewards points to make a donation to the program.
 
Google Offers Logo Google Offers: Google Offers™ teamed up with Starbucks to raise $1.7 million to help create and sustain jobs in America.

Gold Contributor ($250,000 - $999,999)

MasterCard Logo MasterCard: MasterCard is always looking for ways to make an even greater impact in their communities. That's why they joined the Create Jobs for USA program with a $500,000 donation to help create and retain jobs in communities across America.

Silver Contributor ($25,000 - $249,999)

Blast Radius Logo Blast Radius: Blast Radius contributed funds, pro bono website design and development, and digital advertising creative to support Create Jobs for USA.
 
NASDAQ OMX NASDAQ OMX: NASDAQ contributed $25,000 to support CDFIs and the Create Jobs for USA Fund.
 
Speck Logo Speck: Speck contributed $25,000 to Create Jobs for USA Fund and distributed wristbands to the first 5,000 customers to shop during a special holiday promotion.
 
TakePart Logo TakePart: TakePart, the digital division of Participant Media, donated three video vignettes of Create Jobs for USA Awardee loan recipients.

Bronze Contributors ($5 - $24,999)

All of Us Logo All of Us: More than 800,000 individuals and small businesses have donated to the Create Jobs for USA Fund and received an Indivisible wristband to show their support for creating and retaining jobs in the U.S.

ReportS

OFN is publishing a series of three reports to provide an overview of results as well as lessons learned from the initiative. By publishing this series, we hope to demonstrate the successful collaboration of many partners, and how community lenders are contributing to solving the jobs crisis in the U.S. by creating and retaining jobs in underserved urban, rural, and native communities.

"Six Lessons Learned from Create Jobs for USA,” published in May 2014 provides an overview of results of Create Jobs for USA, a successful initiative launched in November 2011 by Starbucks and Opportunity Finance Network to help address the jobs crisis. The first in a series of three reports about Create Jobs for USA, this publication shares the lessons learned from the initiative.

CDFI Practices in Jobs Data Collection and Tracking:  Lessons Learned from Create Jobs for USA” published in October 2014 looks at the data collection efforts behind Create Jobs for USA, sharing what we learned, best practices, and sample CDFI data collection forms and processes. The goal of the paper is to help improve the quality of jobs data collected by the opportunity finance industry.

OFN will publish the third paper on the jobs data results from the more than 30,000 community business loans we have collected from Create Jobs for USA Awardees.

We’d like to thank Member CDFIs who participated in this initiative and helped make it a success. We appreciate your participation: your work to create and retain jobs and to tell the story of CDFIs and the community businesses they serve gave meaning to the effort and helped create or retain more than 5,000 American jobs. We’re also grateful for the strong corporate leadership of Starbucks, without whose vision, leadership, and support this initiative would not have been possible.

Success Stories

Create Jobs for USA helped generate thousands of jobs in communities across the country. Below is a selection of success stories.

Northgate Market, San Diego, CA

Miguel Gonzales is creating jobs in his neighborhood, while bringing local fresh food to the community.

This loan and supermarket opening created 118 full-time jobs, four part-time jobs, and 40 construction jobs, with approximately 25% of all jobs held by local residents.

City Heights, San Diego has a high concentration of lower-income businesses and households, and is home to an ethnically-diverse population. Thanks to a loan from the California FreshWorks Fund (CFWF), managed by NCB Capital Impact, the 119,000 residents of City Heights now have better access to fresh and healthy foods near their homes. NCB Capital Impact disbursed $8.5 million for the development of a new 42,625 square foot, full-service Northgate Gonzalez Market.

Northgate Gonzalez Market is a family-owned chain of supermarkets that was started by the Gonzalez family in 1980. The family currently operates 33 stores located in the southern California counties of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego. Northgate’s markets are full service supermarkets, focused on serving predominately Latino communities. This loan and supermarket opening created 118 full-time jobs, four part-time jobs, and 40 construction jobs, with approximately 25% of all jobs held by local residents.

E.L. Haynes Public Charter School, Washington D.C.

With this expansion, Haynes will be able to serve 400 additional students in 10th-12th grades.

In 2012, TRF provided a $3.5 million loan to E.L. Haynes Public Charter School in Washington, DC, to fund the expansion of their campus to include a high school. Haynes currently serves a diverse student body (52% Black, 28% Hispanic, 18% White, and 2% Asian) of more than 800 students in grades Pre-K through 9th, more than 60% of whom qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. With this expansion, Haynes will be able to serve 400 additional students in 10th-12th grades.

The project has created 75 construction jobs, and once the addition is completed, the school will create 42 new full-time jobs and 20 part-time jobs ranging from teaching positions, to custodians, to administrative staff.

Bitterroot Gymnastics, Missoula, MT

David was able to lease an industrial warehouse in Missoula and transform it into a thriving business that provides children and families throughout the community a safe space in which to learn and practice. The larger space also allowed David to open a movement-based preschool, expanding the options for education in Missoula.

Dedication. Persistence. Teamwork. David Stark teaches these qualities every day at Bitterroot Gymnastics. He bought the business in 2004 after years of learning the ropes—first as a student and then as an employee. By the time he became the owner, he knew just how to realize the gym’s potential. By applying his strong teaching principles and a well-thought-out business strategy, he was quickly able to reduce costs, improve service, and grow the gym into a successful enterprise. In fact, he grew the business so well that he was soon in need of a much larger and more costly space. But David couldn’t find the money to finance the new gym. Solid profits, great income potential, and a steady customer base weren’t enough to overcome the lack of strong collateral and guarantees needed to qualify for traditional financing. Still, David kept knocking on doors. When he went to Montana CDC, his timing was excellent. The CDFI had just introduced a new lending product, which allows strong businesses and entrepreneurs who show the potential for success to borrow money with little or no collateral. Due to the loan from Montana CDC, David was able to lease an industrial warehouse in Missoula and transform it into a thriving business that provides children and families throughout the community a safe space in which to learn and practice. The larger space also allowed David to open a movement-based preschool, expanding the options for education in Missoula. Additionally, by opening the new facility, David created four new jobs—the gym hired one full-time preschool instructor, and three part-time gym instructors.

Lawrence CommunityWorks, Lawrence, MA

The recent global recession has left the city with high unemployment (at 17.8%, it is double the statewide level) and one of the lowest median incomes in the state.

Lawrence CommunityWorks (LCW) is a nonprofit community development corporation working to transform and revitalize the physical, economic, and social landscape of Lawrence, MA. Like many post-industrial cities in America, Lawrence has struggled for some time to re-invent itself for the 21st century. The recent global recession has left the city with high unemployment (at 17.8%, it is double the statewide level) and one of the lowest median incomes in the state. However, LCW has embarked on a major community revitalization project with Union Crossing.

The Union Crossing project is being built on the site of a former foundry and cotton mill on the riverfront. It is a 240,000 sq. ft. building on 5.5 acres, and is being converted into new environmentally sustainable housing units and commercial/retail space. An anchor tenant will be the Lawrence CommunityWorks Financial Stability Center, a project supported by the United Way, which focuses on economic empowerment to break the cycle of inter-generational poverty. By bundling housing and financial opportunities under one roof, Union Crossing Financial Stability Center follows similarly successful models that remove obstacles for families in need while offering an integrated, one-stop service delivery methods of community revitalization.

Phase 1 of the project has just completed, and comprises 60 affordable, energy-efficient housing units subsidized under the Low Income Housing Tax Credit program. Boston Community Capital provided a $492,000 construction bridge loan for the envelope to the building’s retail space, which ensured the building could receive its Certificate of Occupancy in time for the official launch of the housing on December 13, 2011. The next phase of the project, which Boston Community Capital expects to finance, includes commercial business space being built under the New Market Tax Credit program. The project is expected to bring 350 construction jobs, and the commercial space over 200 new permanent jobs.

Resevoir Hill, Baltimore, MD

The loan led to the creation of eight apartments for people with a household income less than 80% of area median income and the creation of 16 full-time jobs for people in the community.

Moses G. Parker is a former Bethlehem Steel worker whose grandmother inspired his interest in real estate development. “They won’t be making any more land,” she said, “so you’d best invest in it.” And that’s exactly what Moses Parker did. In 1985, he started buying and rehabbing single-family properties for low- and moderate-income people. Twenty-seven years later, Parker is still in business, owning and managing the properties he has developed.

In 2006, Parker purchased his first commercial property, a three-story building that he wanted transform into eight, low-income residential apartments. Located in the national historic residential neighborhood of Reservoir Hill, the property had been vacant for several years and needed major repair, as well as preservation of its late 19th century architectural features. Parker sought to finance this work through traditional financial institutions but traditional banks turned him down. A word-of-mouth referral brought Moses to Baltimore Community Lending, which provided him a $500,000 loan to rehab this property. The loan led to the creation of eight apartments for people with a household income less than 80% of area median income and the creation of 16 full-time jobs for people in the community.

When asked about the most beneficial aspects of his work, Parker responded, “I like to create housing that I would live in—livable housing that is affordable. I like providing jobs, too, and this project will do that.”

Lakes Community Health Center, Northwestern, WI

With the expansion, the clinic was able to increase its capacity from 6,500 to 12,000 patients, many of whom had to travel long distances to access care. The expansion also allowed the health center to create 10 full-time jobs.

The Lakes Community Health Center is a Federally Qualified Health Care Center (FQHC) that serves four rural counties in northwestern Wisconsin with clinics in high poverty areas in Iron River and in Ashland. The majority of the health center’s patients are low-income and more than half are children. In 2010, The Lakes received a grant to build an addition to its Iron River location, but outgrew the space in less than two years because of the increasing demand for service. In March of 2012, IFF made a $465,000 loan to the organization to double the clinic’s size, and it also provided a $50,000 loan for medical equipment. With the expansion, the clinic was able to increase its capacity from 6,500 to 12,000 patients, many of whom had to travel long distances to access care. The expansion also allowed the health center to create 10 new, professional, full-time jobs, including positions for medical providers, clinical staff, and administrative support staff.

Next Chapter Bookstore, Barre, VT

Create Jobs for USA Fund helped Cynthia open a small business in Barre, Vermont, creating jobs and revitalizing a community.

"Community Capital of Vermont was able to come through with funding for my loan when conventional methods of borrowing were not an option for me. They helped me realize a dream that I have had for years.”

Cynthia Duprey always wanted to own a bookstore. But when her family home flooded in May 2011, she put her dream on hold. The flood not only displaced Cynthia and her family, but also damaged her credit. As she started to rebuild her life (she closed on a home in January, 2012) she also approached Community Capital of Vermont for a loan to open her dream bookstore. This local CDFI provided Cynthia a $40,000 loan because of her deep roots in the community and to help promote retail in a struggling downtown district. Cynthia will soon open Next Chapter bookstore on Main Street in Barre, Vermont, and the opening will allow her to realize her dream, help revitalize a struggling downtown area, and create two full-time jobs in the community.

American Mug and Stein, East Liverpool, OH

When local banks said no to providing Clyde a loan, a CDFI—and Create Jobs for USA capital grant Awardee—The Progress Fund, said yes, and gave him the $160,000 loan he needed to increase production, providing jobs and hope for the small town.

Clyde McClellan, owner of American Mug and Stein, has one of the last standing pottery companies in the area, and its sales have been suffering due to the recession. It was just getting by, handling small orders with a very small crew. Until recently.

Starbucks, the coffee giant, was looking for a US plant that would make mugs as part of its Indivisible line of American-made merchandise sold in company-owned stores and online to support the Create Jobs for USA initiative. A mutual contact introduced Starbucks to American Mug and Stein, and it seemed like a perfect fit, except for one thing: Because of the size of the initial order for mugs, McClellan needed financing to expand to meet the demands of the increased business.

When local banks said no to providing Clyde a loan, a CDFI—and Create Jobs for USA capital grant Awardee—The Progress Fund, said yes, and gave him the $160,000 loan he needed to increase production, providing jobs and hope for the small town of East Liverpool. The Progress Fund’s loan and Starbucks’ large standing monthly mug order has created eight new full-time jobs in an area where more than 10 percent of working-age residents are unemployed.

Jalen Rose Leadership Academy, Detroit, MI

The loan will allow for the expansion of the school to accommodate 480 students in grades nine through 12.

According to a recent study by Michigan State University, only 32 percent of Detroit’s public high school students graduate in four years. Yet bringing high-quality education to Detroit’s disenfranchised inner city isn’t easy. Traditional banks are reluctant to finance new public schools—particularly innovative ones—because of the perceived risk in investing in low-income community development. So when Operation Graduation, a non-profit organization committed to providing Detroit’s children with more and better educational opportunities, began raising money to acquire and renovate a facility for the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy, they turned to NCB Capital Impact, a CDFI with a long record of successfully financing promising charter schools in low-income communities.

The result was a $1.1 million loan that allowed Operation Graduation to begin renovations on the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy, a new charter high school in midtown Detroit serving approximately 120 ninth graders in its first year of operation, 80 percent of whom qualify for free or reduced price lunches. The loan will allow for the expansion of the school to accommodate 480 students in grades nine through 12. It will also help create 13 new permanent jobs at the school. Named after co-founder Jalen Rose, a former professional basketball player from Detroit and current ESPN analyst, the charter school has received support from multiple sources, including Michigan Future, a group of area foundation and business leaders with a mission to create more high-quality schools in Detroit. The Academy has also partnered with the University of Detroit Mercy, which will allow Jalen Rose students to take college-level courses, and Jeep, which will offer mentoring and other opportunities.

Impact Makers, Richmond, VA

VCC, along with six mission investors, provided funding that enabled Impact Makers to create 26 full-time jobs and recruit the best and brightest talent in the field.

Michael Pirron, founder and chief executive officer of Impact Makers, an IT and management consulting firm in Richmond, VA, enjoys competition—and is good at it. His firm recently posted a three-year growth that earned it a place on Inc. magazine’s list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies. Tremendous growth aside, what really makes the company stand out among competitors is its business model. A socially minded for-profit without shareholders, Impact Makers donates its profits—and offers pro-bono consulting—to local charities.

Pirron realized the next step for his business, if it’s to continue making an impact competitively and charitably, is expansion. A business partner connected him to Virginia Community Capital (VCC), which shares Impact Makers' commitment to social responsibility. VCC, along with six mission investors, provided funding that enabled Impact Makers to create 26 full-time jobs and recruit the best and brightest talent in the field. As a result, the firm has already doubled sales projections for the year, forecasting good returns for the company and its nonprofit beneficiaries.

Housing Partnership, Louisville, KY

The property's nonprofit developer, Housing Partnership, needed a partner that could provide permanent equity as well as construction financing, but most investors were unwilling to participate in such a small deal.

FAHE closed a $716,000 construction loan to transform a historic Catholic school building into a 24-unit apartment building for seniors in Louisville, with the help of a capital grant from Create Jobs for USA.

The property's nonprofit developer, Housing Partnership, needed a partner that could provide permanent equity as well as construction financing, but most investors were unwilling to participate in such a small deal. By applying FAHE's expertise in rental housing for rural communities, the developers get the capital they need and investors get a reliable return.

The project will break ground and begin construction in January and will employ 131 workers during construction and preserve 23 jobs through ongoing management, maintenance, and supportive services.

Sister Sky, Spokane, WA

Sister Sky products share Native American herbal wisdom with a worldwide audience in an authentic and respectful manner that promotes harmony, balance, education, sustainability, and cultural sharing.

Sister Sky was established in 1999 by sisters Monica Gutierrez-Simeon and Marina Gutierrez-TurningRobe, both members of the Spokane Tribe. Sister Sky's mission is to create natural bath and body products inspired by herbal wisdom of Native American culture. Honoring these traditions, the company formulates its products with a guiding principle: Infuse botanical ingredients to enhance health and wellness. Sister Sky products share Native American herbal wisdom with a worldwide audience in an authentic and respectful manner that promotes harmony, balance, education, sustainability, and cultural sharing. It is the only personal care product line approved by the Intertribal Agriculture Council to use the "Made by American Indians" trademark. The products, including body wash, lotion, shampoo, conditioner, and soap, are formulated to be gentle to the skin, with no mineral oil or petroleum products, they are paraben- and lanolin-free, biodegradable, and not tested on animals. Their high-quality products featuring eco-friendly packaging are in high demand by such groups as a national hotel amenities products distributor, which gave a contract to the Spokane-based company.

In anticipation of production growth, Sister Sky approached a traditional financing institution for a loan in September of 2011, but Monica and Marina were turned down, so they approached Craft3 in first quarter 2012. Craft3 provided them a $300,000 loan which will expand Sister Sky’s capacity to serve existing tribal gaming properties and expand into regional and national hotel chains. Craft3’s loan allowed the borrower to capitalize on their improved business model, and create one new full-time position.

Brookford Farm, Canterbury, NH

The loans saved 10 jobs, are creating a handful of construction jobs, and will create five part-time seasonal jobs, all while preserving open land and encouraging sustainable family farming.

For four years, organic farmers Luke and Catarina Mahoney—owners of Brookford Farm—provided residents throughout New Hampshire’s seacoast with healthy, natural, locally-grown food. Then they learned that the lease on their farmland wouldn’t be renewed. The New Hampshire Community Loan Fund (Community Loan Fund) provided a loan to help the couple buy a parcel of land and renovate an existing dairy farm there to build a new Brookford Farm. Community Loan Fund also provided a subsequent loan to finance their new equipment needs. The loans saved 10 jobs, are creating a handful of construction jobs, and will create five part-time seasonal jobs, all while preserving open land and encouraging sustainable family farming.

Awardees

Congratulations to the 120 OFN CDFIs that have received grants from Create Jobs for USA. Learn more about each at our Find a CDFI locator.  

  • Access to Capital for Entrepreneurs
  • Accion Chicago
  • Accion Texas Inc.
  • Alternatives Federal Credit Union
  • Arcata Economic Development Corporation
  • Arizona MultiBank Community Development Corporation
  • Baltimore Community Lending
  • Bethex Federal Credit Union
  • Black Business Investment Fund of Central Florida
  • BOC Capital Corporation
  • Boston Community Capital
  • Bridgeway Capital
  • Business Center for New Americans
  • Calvert Social Investment Foundation
  • Century Housing
  • Charter Schools Development Corporation
  • Chicago Community Loan Fund
  • Cincinnati Development Fund
  • Citizen Potawatomi CDC
  • Coastal Enterprises, Inc.
  • Colorado Enterprise Fund
  • Community Assets for People LLC
  • Community Capital of NY
  • Community Capital of Vermont
  • Community Concepts Finance Corporation
  • Community First Fund
  • Community Housing Capital
  • Community Loan Fund of the Capital Region
  • Community Redevelopment Loan and Investment Fund
  • Community Reinvestment Fund
  • Community Ventures Corporation
  • CommunityWorks Carolina
  • Cooperative Business Assistance Corporation
  • Cooperative Fund of New England
  • Corporation for Supportive Housing
  • Craft3
  • Disability Opportunity Fund
  • Economic and Community Development Institute
  • Economic Opportunities Fund
  • El Paso Collaborative for Community & Economic Development
  • Enterprise Community Loan Fund
  • Enterprise Development Fund
  • Entrepreneur Fund
  • Entrepreneur Works
  • Fahe
  • FINANTA
  • First State Community Loan Fund
  • Florida Community Loan Fund
  • Forward Community Investments
  • Freedom First Federal Credit Union
  • Fresno CDFI
  • Genesis Community Loan Fund
  • Grameen America
  • Greater New Haven Community Loan Fund
  • Gulf Coast Renaissance Corporation
  • Hartford Community Loan Fund
  • Hope Enterprise Corporation
  • Housing Assistance Council, Inc.
  • Housing Fund, The (Nashville Housing Fund)
  • Idaho Nevada CDFI
  • IFF
  • Initiative Foundation
  • Intersect Fund
  • Justine Petersen Housing and Reinvestment Corp.
  • Kentucky Habitat for Humanity
  • Kentucky Highlands Investment Corporation
  • Leviticus 25:23 Alternative Fund
  • Local Initiatives Support Corporation
  • Low Income Investment Fund
  • Lowcounty Housing Trust
  • MACED
  • MaineStream Finance
  • Maryland Capital Enterprises
  • Mercy Loan Fund
  • Midwest Minnesota Community Development Corporation
  • Mile High Community Loan Fund
  • Montana Community Development Corp.
  • Mountain BizWorks
  • National Housing Trust Community Development Fund
  • Natural Capital Investment Fund
  • NCALL Research Inc
  • NCB Capital Impact
  • Nebraska Enterprise Fund
  • NeighborWorks Capital
  • New Hampshire Community Loan Fund
  • New Jersey Community Capital
  • Nonprofit Finance Fund
  • Nonprofits Assistance Fund
  • Northern California Community Loan Fund
  • Northern Initiatives
  • Northland Foundation
  • Oakland Business Development Center
  • Ohio Capital Finance Corporation
  • Opportunities Credit Union
  • Opportunity Fund
  • Partners for the Common Good
  • Pathway Lending
  • People Incorporated Financial Services
  • PeopleFund
  • Primary Care Development Corporation
  • Progress Fund
  • Reinvestment Fund
  • Rising Tide Community Loan Fund
  • Rural Community Assistance Corporation
  • Rural Electric Economic Development, Inc.
  • San Luis Obispo County Housing Trust Fund
  • Santa Cruz Community Credit Union
  • Seattle Economic Development Fund
  • Self-Help & Affiliates
  • Support Center
  • TELACU Community Capital
  • The Loan Fund
  • TruFund Financial Services
  • Twin Cities Community Land Bank
  • Valley Economic Development Center
  • Vermont Community Loan Fund
  • Virginia Community Capital
  • Wisconsin Womens Business Initiative Corporation
  • WomanVenture
  • Working Solutions
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